Latest
  • Welcome!

    We're a UK based community of cult entertainment fans - so whether you're into WWE, Marvel, DC, Game of Thrones, Walking Dead, Star Wars, Doctor Who, Star Trek and more - join us!

    It's free to register, so why not sign up and discuss whatever you're into...

Mitsuharu Misawa pronounced dead

JobberJoe

Well-Known Member
Subscriber
Messages
5,153
Points
63
RIP Misawa.

This really is a terrible shame.

He was just one of the true legends of the biz :(.
 

Evil Gringo

Not really Evil, but I like Burritos
Messages
17,945
Points
113
Does anyone think that this will bring in some changes with regards to how stiff the Japanese style is worked?

Click Here


It's my article on W101.com from 2004 about how Strong Style may be too strong in the wake of Takayama wrestling three stiff matches in a row (Nakanishi and Sasaki in the NJPW G-1 Climax and Sano in NOAH) and then collapsed after the Sasaki fight from suffering a stroke.

Nagata recently had a stroke like injury, Hashimoto died of a brain injury brought on by recurring damage from actions in the ring and Shibata also killed a fellow young lion Masakazu Fukuda in 2000 with a flying forearm.

Nothing has been done then and nothing will really be done now as this is the style that has prevailed in Japan since the early 1990's and its what sells the seats.

EDIT Also for those people who want to know more about the legend that was Misawa then try the following links...

W101 Profile


Wikipedia Article


There way also be a new piece on W101 in the wake of this tragedy as well.
 
Last edited:

hendrixsummer69

New Member
Messages
569
Points
0
ive never watched much japenese wrestling but he still helped the bussiness and human he died doing what he loved i supprose its better then going as a broken down old man at home RIP
 

Evil Gringo

Not really Evil, but I like Burritos
Messages
17,945
Points
113
In more bad news for NOAH Akiyama has herniated two of the discs in his lower back and had to vacate the title in the aftermath of the show where Misawa died.

Akiyama in his role as booker set up a decision match for the title on today's show between Rikio and Go Shiozaki which was won by Go today.

Saito wrestled today in a tag match with Momota against Yone and Suzuki. He was visibly weeping at several points.

NJPW allowed Kikuchi and Aoki to hold a ten bell salute before their show (the two are currently competing in the BOSJ tournament), NOAH also did a similar salute and had a memorial set up for fans to pay their respects as well as playing Spartan X (Misawa's long time theme song) during which their was a huge MISAWA call from the crowd.

ROH did a ten bell salute in his honour and several wrestlers such as Jericho and Chris Hero have spoken of their sadness at his passing although the best comment comes from Jim Ross...

Mitsuharu Misawa was never an acquaintance of mine but I felt like I knew him from watching many of his DVD's which were usually with men that I did know. Misawa was arguably the best in ring performer in the world in his prime. First of all, Misawa knew how to wrestle and how to wrestle physically. The fundamentals had been drilled into this legend as a young man who went on to become a Japanese National Amateur Champion. Several things stood out to me about Misawa. In addition to be a physical, fundamentally sound athlete, timing and toughness were two of his greatest attributes. Great timing is a gift that largely can't be taught. It's like ring psychology. Some of it can be taught but mostly it must be a learned trait and some people are in the business for years and never learn great timing or main event level ring psychology. Toughness is another trait that can be nurtured but generally can't be taught. Misawa was naturally tough and it showed. And his fans loved him for it. They also loved his passion and the emotional ride on which he would take them. That's what pro wrestling is, selling emotion.

Another significant piece of Japanese, wrestling history died this weekend. Mitsuharu Misawa apparently died in the very spot that he gained his incredible fame and resounding respect from wrestling fans around the Globe....inside a wrestling ring.

It's a damn shame that the vast majority of American wrestling fans won't give a second thought about the untimely death of "a Japanese wrestler." I encourage all fans to find DVD's of Misawa and watch him in his prime, in the 90's especially. If one is really serious about about being a highly skilled, pro wrestler, then study the late Mitsuharu Misawa.

May he rest in peace.
Spot on Jim.
 

Frank Botch

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,287
Points
48
That video is really distressing,the look on Takayama's face,the crowd chanting, the eerie silence.... just terribly sad.

Few pictures leading on from Gringo's post.





Apparently Saito also spoke saying ''I will carry the heavy cross on my back''. I feel terrible for the guy.
 

MojoPogo

New Member
Messages
6,059
Points
0
If anyone deserved to wear the moniker, true legend, it was Misawa, and not just for how he performed in the ring either. He deserved better, however, as much as there will no doubt be debate on the japanese style and intensity, i personally think that the man himself wouldnt have had it any other way, all those involved know the risks, and unfortunately as in any high intensity, high impact sport, sometimes tragic accidents happen. My heart goes out to his family and those in the ring at the time, i cant even begin to imagine how i'd feel..................RIP, a true wrestling god.
 

The GS

New Member
Messages
4,799
Points
0
If this was an American wrestler I'm pretty sure the "s" word would be mentioned and the US media would be having a field day with Marc Mero talking nonsense on shows.
 

The Fury

The Last King of Scotland
Subscriber
Messages
5,714
Points
48
[YOUTUBE]<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/MJ0jRecmdWc&hl=en&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/MJ0jRecmdWc&hl=en&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>[/YOUTUBE]

This is my tribute to Misawa from my youtube show. There's links to some of his classic matches on the side as well. Its' not much, but i thought it was something i could do so say thanks for his contribution to wrestling.
 

Paul

Well-Known Member
Messages
36,527
Points
113
I'd never even heard of him before, but RIP.
Really? Wow.




Anyhow, cause of death has been determined.


Wrestling legend Mitsuharu Misawa died on Saturday night after suffering spinal damage during a match in Hiroshima. He was 46.

Misawa was fighting in a tag team match at Hiroshima Green Arena in front of around 2,300 spectators. During the match, opponent Akitoshi Saito used a back suplex on him, causing him to strike his head and leaving him unable to move. His heart stopped shortly after.

A doctor in the audience reportedly used an automated external defibrillator (AED) to try and start his heart again, but to no avail. He was rushed to hospital where he was declared dead at 10:10 p.m. It later turned out that the cause of his death was damage to his cervical spinal cord.

A 20-year-old spectator said: "He hit his head after the back suplex and was knocked unconscious. The EMTs were performing CPR for a long time. But even during the match Misawa kept shaking his head, and he looked to be in a bad way."

Misawa was a member of Ashikodai High School's wrestling club before making his professional debut in 1981 with All Japan Pro-Wrestling (AJPW). In 1984, he gained fame for the first time as Tiger Mask II, before taking off the mask six years later and fighting under his own name, standing alongside fellow legends Giant Baba and Jumbo Tsuruta. He left AJPW in 2000 to form his own promotion unit, Pro Wrestling Noah.

The last death in a Japanese professional wrestling ring occurred in 2000, when New Japan Pro-Wrestling fighter Masakazu Fukuda died after striking his head. He was aged 27.

Credit: Mainichi news

Also another death has occured in Japanese wrestling, I forget the guys name, Ted something I think, but he died during a show last night I belive.
 

Frank Botch

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,287
Points
48
Really? Wow.


Also another death has occured in Japanese wrestling, I forget the guys name, Ted something I think, but he died during a show last night I belive.
It was a ref with Osaka Pro
Sadly Ted Tanabe (real name Tetsuo Tanabe) never regained consciousness from his collapse last night and passed away at 12:23. Tanabe was 46 years of age.

More details will be posted when they are released by Osaka Pro-Wrestling.
Pretty eerie stuff, same age as Misawa too.
 

The GS

New Member
Messages
4,799
Points
0
The Japanese do wrestle a lot stiffer and more real than in American wrestling so that could've been one of the main factors in his death.
 

MojoPogo

New Member
Messages
6,059
Points
0
The Japanese do wrestle a lot stiffer and more real than in American wrestling so that could've been one of the main factors in his death.
I think we'll put this down to a tragic accident rather than the style. Fact of the matter is, the wrong landing or impact, and this could happen in any federation, anywhere, its a risk all wrestlers take unfortunately. Rather than discuss "banning suplexes" or anything like that, instead respect each and every wrestler who gets in the ring for putting they're bodies on the line in the name of entertainment, unfortunately Misawa is not the first to die in the ring, and its highly unlikely he'll be the last, no matter how "safe" they try to make it.
 

ShaolinHandLock

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,319
Points
48
The fact that that referee died in similar circumstances, only a few days later, in the same country, at the same age, is really creepy.
 
Top