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Celebrities in Trouble Over College Scandal

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Apparently celebs like Lori Loughlin (Full House) and Felicity Huffman (Desperate Housewives) bribed officials to get their progeny into prestigious colleges. I thought the practice was common among the well-to-do so I'm surprised to learn that it's illegal. What do you think about the news that some celebrities and wealthy people are being indicted across the pond for bribing college administrators? Does it seem overblown to you?
 

Poppy

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I have so many thoughts:
1. I didn't realize that USC was that prestigious.
2. These wealthy people weren't paying much to get their kid a guaranteed spot or higher test score. I guess coaching and teaching, even at sought after schools, just doesn't pay enough.
3. Many of these kids came from a long line of highly educated people. I thought some of our intelligence was determined by genetics. Shouldn't these kids have been smart enough to get in on their own?
4. I feel sorry for the kids who didn't know.
5. THIS IS A CRIME?
 
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Yeah, it's the unofficial official option for the rich — using money and/or fame to get their kids into certain schools. What's weird is faking sports profiles. Photoshopping kids' faces onto athletes' bodies, for sports those kids have no interest or intention of playing?
 
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Well, being a celebrity comes with its own challenges but it would be very unfair for them to use unconventional means to achieve something. Shouldn't all of this be based on merit and affordability? A well-known person is always on everyone's radar and any wrong move makes news headlines.
 

Zack T

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I believe the actual crime mostly comes from having proctors altering test results or giving the kids extra time on SAT's and whatnot, or from having people take the tests for the kids entirely. That's fraudulent.

Not sure about the admissions aspect of it. I know that colleges are expected to adhere to certain standards for admitting new students, but I'm not sure they're bound by anything other than anti-discrimination laws on that one.
 
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While it is indeed illegal (I believe they were charged with racketeering), I'm surprised they were actually held accountable for their actions! That was the biggest shock for me. It's well known that rich people can quite literally get away with murder by throwing money at all their problems until they disappear. I'd like to believe this is a sign that times are changing.
 
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I have so many thoughts:
1. I didn't realize that USC was that prestigious.
I know! But then, USC is near Hollywood and has loads of alumni in entertainment like George Lucas, Ron Howard, and various actors. So, maybe "status" and future job connections?
 
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I think USC is definitely elite because of the status. I do some people who have gotten into USC and said that quality really isn't amazing but it is more of a status thing because the rich kids go there for the "college experience". Which is exactly what happened here. It doesn't surprise me that it happened, we all know money can buy you a lot of things.
 
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The kids should be kicked out of those schools, regardless of if they knew. They didn't get in on their own merit. If you buy stolen goods, no matter how innocent you, are you still have to return them. The degrees that have been earned should also be cancelled out. Several of the kids did know about the cheating and actively participated in it. If they were willing to do that, they'd be willing to cheat throughout school too. Who's to say that the degree was really earned.

Why was Lorie's bail set so high when compared to the others?
 
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Although it is not a serious crime, it is unfair to the students who worked hard to get in, as well as those who got rejected for failing to meet the requirements.
 
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Well, if indeed they were charged for their actions, then times could be changing. There is really no point in being dishonest with such admissions because eventually, everything tends to come out.
 
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